Australia’s most commonly mispronounced words according to writer Kel Richards

How do you say fifth? Writer reveals the Australia’s most commonly mispronounced words – and his SCATHING opinion of why they’re stated incorrectly

  • Writer Kel Richards revealed Australia’s most mispronounced words
  • The wordsmith, 75, stated fifth and remuneration are among the many most widespread
  • Often, burglar, and the phrase ‘pleaded responsible’ have been additionally extensively misspoken 
  • Mr Richards claims mispronunciation is brought on by a ‘lazy thoughts and lazy mouth’


An Australian writer has revealed the nation’s most mispronounced words – and his scathing opinion of why they’re stated incorrectly.

In an interview with Sky News, famend wordsmith Kel Richards stated he obtained a ‘tsunami’ of emails from viewers complaining in regards to the mispronunciation of fifth, and normality, and remuneration, the time period for cash paid for work or a service.

The 75-year-old stated dozens extra puzzled why usually, burglar and the phrase ‘pleaded responsible’ are so extensively misspoken.

After claiming that mispronunciation is brought on by a ‘lazy thoughts and lazy mouth’, Mr Richards expressed disbelief in regards to the confusion surrounding ‘remuneration’.

‘I nonetheless do not perceive how individuals could make that mistake, in the event that they’re in the least educated, as a result of they cannot write the phrase like that,’ he stated.

Australia’s most commonly mispronounced words

Correct: Remuneration

Incorrect: Renumeration

Correct: Fifth

Incorrect: Fith

Correct: Normality

Incorrect: Normalcy

Correct: Pleaded responsible

Incorrect: Plead responsible

Correct: Burglar

Incorrect: Burg-u-lar

Correct: Often

Incorrect: Off-ten

Later within the phase, Mr Richards dismissed the mispronunciation of the phrase fifth –  which Australians usually say as ‘fith’ – as nothing however laziness.

‘They miss the ‘f’ within the center…these items are brought on by a lazy mouth or a lazy thoughts, and this can be a lazy mouth – it is somebody not bothering to carry their backside lip up to their enamel,’ he stated.

He supplied comparable criticism for many who pronounce usually as ‘off-ten’, with a tough ‘t’.

Australian writer Kel Richards dismissed the mispronunciation of the phrase fifth – which Australians usually say as ‘fith’ – as nothing however laziness (inventory picture)

Mr Richards stated anybody who says ‘normalcy’ as a substitute of ‘normality’ utilizing an Americanised model of the phrase, whereas individuals who say ‘plead responsible’ as a substitute of the proper previous participle ‘pleaded’ are utilizing a colloquialism from Scotland.

The clarifications, which have racked up nearly 4,000 views since they have been uploaded to YouTube on Wednesday, sparked passionate responses. 

‘OFF-TEN is a pet peeve of mine, spoken on the US east coast. The T is silent,’ one man wrote.

one

Another widely misspoken term is 'pleaded guilty'

He stated a few of Australia’s most commonly pronounced words embrace burglar (left) and the phrase ‘pleaded responsible’

After claiming that mispronunciation is caused by a 'lazy mind and lazy mouth', Mr Richards expressed disbelief about the confusion surrounding 'remuneration' (stock image)

After claiming that mispronunciation is brought on by a ‘lazy thoughts and lazy mouth’, Mr Richards expressed disbelief in regards to the confusion surrounding ‘remuneration’ (inventory picture)

Others vented their frustration about extra mispronunciations.

‘The most cringeworthy Aussie pronunciation is saying knowledge as ‘darter’ as a substitute of ‘day ter’,’ one man wrote.

‘How about ‘ought to have’ as a substitute of the wrong ‘ought to of’,’ stated a second.

A 3rd added: ‘Prahran (the realm). I’m all the time listening to individuals who can not pronounce Prahran attempting to assist others pronounce it. Only deep routed outdated Melbourne folks get it proper,’ 

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